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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2012 6:00am EST
us back to the middle east that we used the to know the arabs and israelis going at it and egypt being -- [inaudible] but right before that iran saw its fortunes decline, its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation introduced a very, very important element, almost sectarian element, that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this, of course, goes into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons. this is a good time to start negotiating with iran as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, it's not as soft power, superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the renal payoff the situation -- in the region because of the situation in lebanon and syria. p lebanon is really the coming disaster, and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so, of course, all of this will go on. and if i were american, i would say this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 12:00am EST
the librarian in alex dry ya egypt, for instance, who roughly measured the world with not much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground... ... >> on the other hand, the texas state books are of controversy they spend more erred time talking about jefferson davis bid thomas jefferson borough talking about school books specifically they're determined in different states and they have rules what they could and should say. i am not a textbook writer or critic. there is a problem. i grew up with books that did not have the non-white to european model. i was trying to address the under representation. in recent years there is a sense not including the asians and hispanic americans. one of the things when i wrote my book america is a hidden history talking about spanish america talk about columbus but the spanish in the united states of america of this is what i thought was an extraordinary story not told to me. the first pilgrims. there were not englishmen sailing over on the mayflower but they were french. they have a good sense to go to florida in june and sale 50 years
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 12:00pm EST
the librarian in alexandria, egypt, for instance. i hope i am not mangling his name to badly. roughly measure the world with not much more than, you know, a calendar and the sun and the big stick in the ground. and when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the natural world, that comes out of your curiosity, that is what i think i'm talking about when i talk about kids natural curiosity and how we have to keep telling the stories to fire up their imagination and creativity. >> host: zero contrarian tweet sent to you, these days history class is tend to focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. do we spend -- are we to eurocentric? to spend too much time on the magellan and columbus? >> tina, that's a good question. i think it has been somewhat addressed. some people think that it has swung too far. i know, for instance, there were some concerns a few years ago that there were history standards coming out that did not mention robert e. lee. on the other hand, there are the texas state textbooks which have been the subject -- subject of some co
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 10:00pm EST
your mother would be gone for years. she came to the u.s. in egypt even know it. >> guest: she's still like that in a way, you know, where she does things that we don't fit into the equation sometimes. and it's been a struggle to get her to be a little more motherly. i think at this point we've come to expect that's the way she is and we just take her as she is. i think it helps because we're not disappointed. i do hope we could be a better grandmother. i know my great-grandmother, my mother said she wasn't such a great mother. but to ask him if she was the most wonderful grandmother in the world. so i'm hoping that's the way my children feel for her as well. that's all i want for my kids have a good relationship. >> host: reyna grandecan assume other mother to read this book, or does she know within a? >> guest: she hasn't read the book is it's in english and my mother does not speak english. she knows some of us in it because i told her this is the story about my childhood and growing up in the u.s. and i write about you, my dad, but i don't think my mother really understand about ho
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 9:00am EST
people made these very extraordinary discoveries. i talk about the librarian in alexandria, egypt, eratosthenes. of i'm not mangling his name too badly who roughly measured the world without much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground. when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the national -- natural world that comes out your curiosity that is what i'm talking about what i talk about kids's natural security of a city and how we have to keep telling these stories to fire up their imagination and their creativity. >> guest: history classes focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. are we too for course been too much, and magellan and columbus and so on? >> that is a good question and it has been somewhat addressed, some people think that it has one too far. for instance there was some concern a few years ago that their history stand is coming that the dimension robert e. lee and on the other hand the texas textbooks have been a subject of controversy because they spend more time talking about jefferson davi
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)